Why India’s moon mission should be classed a success

Topics:

Earth and Space Sciences – The Solar System

Physical Sciences – Forces

Additional: Careers, Technology.

Concepts (South Australia):

Earth and Space Sciences – Earth in Space

Physical Sciences – Forces and Motion

Years: 7, 10, 11, 12

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Robots will need to understand why they’re doing work – Australia’s Science Channel

This Australian invention could fix our recycling crisis – Australia’s Science Channel

Why India’s moon mission should be classed a success – Australia’s Science Channel

Why India’s moon mission should be classed a success – Australia’s Science Channel

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Word Count: 772

While India’s Chandrayaan-2 mission didn’t go exactly to plan, there is still a lot to gain from the mission. This article could be used with students studying Physical or Earth and Space Sciences in year 7 and 10. It would provide a good opportunity to discuss Australia’s future in space exploration as well as the positives of failure.

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