A short history of atoms

In the centuries since the discovery of the famously uncuttable atom, scientists and philosophers alike have delved deeply into its form and function. As our powers of observation become increasingly sophisticated, we’ve found there is much yet to learn, as … Continued

A Touching Display

Today’s interactive screens may seem like magic, but as Lee Constable explains, the tech is decades old and based on surprisingly simple principles. Discuss the application of Physics and Chemistry understanding in a real-life context that students will definitely be … Continued

Head in the Clouds

You've heard of cloud nine – but what about clouds one through 10? Looking to the heavens, weather presenter and meteorologist Nate Byrne handcuffs thunder, throws lightning in jail, and even comes up with an entirely new word for “fog”. … Continued

The Internet of Temporary Things

Cash in your silicone chips – paper and plastic are about to make a comeback. As sensors fill the world with an endless stream of data on every aspect of our lives, Moore’s Law dictates that traditional silicon-based systems won’t … Continued

Windows to the Stars

For seven decades, the world worked to map the heavens – a massive endeavour that ran from the 19th century to the era of manned space flight, taking in two world wars and vast social change. In this article, we … Continued

Refracted Glory

Before Galileo, Descartes and Newton, Thomas Harriot made some of the breakthroughs ascribed to his famous peers – but as Robyn Arianrhod explains, it’s his investigation into an everyday occurrence that shows just what it takes to discover a scientific … Continued

The Science of Fireworks

Ever wondered about what’s behind the big bangs and bright sparks of New Year’s Eve? Nathan Kilah ignites the discussion. Seeing the relevance of chemical reactions on students everyday life can be hard for them, however the importance of fireworks … Continued

Naracoorte Caves: A rolls-royce record of biodiversity

The geological records below ground in Naracoorte, South Australia are relatively young, dating 500,000 years to less than 1000. But researchers hope these records can inform conservation efforts about extinctions, adaptations, climate change and human impact. These fossils from the … Continued

Shining a Light on the Hidden Universe

The night sky has always been a source of wonder, but it wasn’t until the 20th century that we could see the universe in its full glory – across the whole electromagnetic spectrum. This resource is best suited to Earth … Continued

SCINEMA: Putting the Science in Cinema

SCINEMA Junior is open for 2021!To find out more, and submit entries, visit scinema.org.au/junior Bring SCINEMA To Your Classroom or Livingroom SCINEMA is the largest international science film festival in the southern hemisphere, showcasing the best science feature, documentary, animated … Continued