Bacteria helps robot to get a grip

Topics:

Biological Sciences – Cells, The Body

Chemical Sciences – Atoms, Particle Models

Physical Sciences – Energy

Additional: Careers, Technology, Engineering

Concepts (South Australia):

Biological Sciences – Form and Function

Chemical Sciences – Properties of Matter

Physical Sciences – Energy

Years: 8, 9, 10

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Bacteria help robot to get a grip | Cosmos

Bacteria help robot to get a grip | Cosmos

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Word Count: 433

A robot with a handful of e.coli can do things other robots can’t. This groundbreaking research should provide students with an excellent application of technology and engineering in science and demonstrate a future path for STEM research. It would be most suited to years 8, 9, and 10.

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